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J Obstet Gynaecol. 2012 Jan;32(1):68-72. doi: 10.3109/01443615.2011.633718.

Oxidative stress and prolidase activity in women with uterine fibroids.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, Turkey. drmvural@yahoo.com

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate oxidative stress markers and prolidase activity in serum and tissue samples of women with uterine fibroids, with further analysis on position and size. Lipid hydroperoxide, ceruloplasmin, catalase, arylesterase, free sulfhydryl group activity and prolidase activity levels were measured in fibroid tissue, myometrial tissue and serum of the same patients (n = 51), at the same time. Results show that ceruloplasmin, catalase, arylesterase, free sulfhydryl group and prolidase activities were higher in fibroid tissue than those in myometrial tissue (p = 0.003, 0.009, 0.004, 0.02, 0.008, respectively). Serum levels of catalase and prolidase were lower, and arylesterase and free sulfhydryl groups were higher in the fibroid group than those in the control group (p < 0.001 for all). Fibroid volume in submucosal subgroup of the fibroid group yield significant correlation with ceruloplasmin, catalase, arylesterase and prolidase activities (r = 0.84, p = 0.02; r = 0.93, p < 0.001; r = 0.63, p = 0.049 and r = 0.87, p = 0.01, respectively). Despite the lack of statistical significance, the highest levels of prolidase activity were found in fibroid samples, especially in submucosal ones. It is concluded that this study demonstrated increased antioxidative repair system in the fibroid tissue compared to the myometrium and serum of the same patients. Additionally, higher pathophysiological potential of the submucosal fibroids over intramural and subserosal fibroids were shown with the levels of oxidative stress markers and prolidase activity levels.

PMID:
22185542
DOI:
10.3109/01443615.2011.633718
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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