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J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):351-8. doi: 10.1097/HJH.0b013e32834e5ac7.

Markers of cardiovascular disease risk after hypertension in pregnancy.

Author information

1
Departments of Medicine and Renal Medicine, St George Hospital, University of New South Wales, Kogarah, New South Wales, Australia. g.mangos@unsw.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Women with a history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Underlying cardiovascular risk factors, persistent endothelial dysfunction or sympathetic overactivity may contribute to this risk. We studied markers of cardiovascular disease risk in nonpregnant women with a history of hypertension in pregnancy.

METHODS:

Women with a history of preeclampsia (n = 39), gestational hypertension (n = 27) and normal pregnancies (n = 35) were studied 2-12 years after delivery. Laboratory measures included plasma fasting lipids, glucose, insulin, creatinine and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Blood pressure was measured by 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, endothelial function by flow-mediated dilatation and sympathetic activity by both head-up tilt test and cold pressor test, including the response of the circulating renin-angiotensin system to tilt testing.

RESULTS:

Compared with women who had previous normal pregnancies, women with a history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension have higher ambulatory blood pressure, BMI and relative insulin resistance. Glomerular filtration rate, albumin-to-creatinine ratio, endothelial function and sympathetic activity was similar among the three groups.

CONCLUSION:

Women with a history of preeclampsia or gestational hypertension have features of the metabolic syndrome which are presumably present already before pregnancy, predisposing them to hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and later cardiovascular risk. In this study, we found no evidence for early renal damage, endothelial dysfunction or sympathetic overactivity in the postpartum state.

PMID:
22179081
DOI:
10.1097/HJH.0b013e32834e5ac7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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