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J Pediatr. 2012 May;160(5):801-806.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.11.003. Epub 2011 Dec 16.

Procedural sedation for diagnostic imaging in children by pediatric hospitalists using propofol: analysis of the nature, frequency, and predictors of adverse events and interventions.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. srinivasan_m@kids.wustl.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the nature, frequency, and predictors of adverse events during the use of propofol by pediatric hospitalists.

STUDY DESIGN:

We reviewed 1649 charts of patients sedated with propofol by pediatric hospitalists at St Louis Children's Hospital between January 2005 and September 2009.

RESULTS:

Hospitalists were able to complete 1633 of the 1649 sedations reviewed (99%). Major complications included 2 patients with aspiration and 1 patient intubated to complete the study. We observed a 74% reduction in the number of patients with respiratory events and airway interventions from 2005 to 2009. Predictors of respiratory events were history of snoring (OR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.52-3.80), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status classification of ASA 3 (OR, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.22-4.33), age >12 years (OR, 4.01; 95% CI, 2.02-7.98), premedication with midazolam (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.15-2.98), and use of adjuvant glycopyrrolate (OR, 4.70; 95% CI, 2.35-9.40). All except ASA 3 status were also predictors for airway intervention. There was a decline in the prevalence of all of these predictors over the study years (P < .05) except for use of glycopyrrolate.

CONCLUSION:

Our pediatric hospitalists implemented a successful propofol sedation program that realized a 74% reduction in respiratory events and airway interventions between 2005 and 2009. Decreased prevalence of the predictors of adverse events that we identified likely contributed to this reduction.

PMID:
22177990
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.11.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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