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Obes Surg. 2012 Mar;22(3):445-51. doi: 10.1007/s11695-011-0583-y.

Central pedicled breast reduction technique in male patients after massive weight loss.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Dreifaltigkeits-Hospital, Wesseling, Germany. Dr.Stoff@t-online.de

Abstract

Male patients after massive weight loss often suffer from redundant skin and soft tissue in the anterior and lateral chest region, causing various deformities of pseudogynecomastia. Techniques with free or pedicled nipple-areola complex (NAC) transposition are widely accepted. The authors present their approach to male breast reduction with preservation of the NAC on a central dermoglandular pedicle and a wide elliptical tissue excision of breast and lateral thorax tissue in combination with liposuction. Male breast reduction was performed on patients after moderate to massive weight loss due to diet or bariatric procedures. Former procedures included free nipple-areola grafts or inferior pedicled techniques for NAC preservation. As a modification, we performed a central pedicled breast reduction on nine male patients with excessive liposuction of the pedicle and a horizontal elliptical skin removal, allowing for sufficient tissue removal at the lateral thorax. From October 2010 until June 2011, nine male patients had central pedicled breast reconstructions after massive weight loss. Mean age was 29.1 years, mean preoperative body mass index was 29.2, and mean preoperative weight loss was 63.9 kg. The chest wall improvement was rated "very good" by eight patients. No major complications occurred in all nine patients. Male chest deformities after massive weight loss can be dealt by several approaches. The optimal scar positioning and the preservation of NAC may be the most challenging aspects of these procedures. Therefore, the preservation of the NAC on a central dermoglandular pedicle with a horizontal submammary scar course may optimize the esthetic outcome.

PMID:
22173651
DOI:
10.1007/s11695-011-0583-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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