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Med J Aust. 2011 Dec 19;195(11-12):666-9.

The health impacts of khat: a qualitative study among Somali-Australians.

Author information

1
TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD. h.douglas@law.uq.edu.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To identify patterns of khat use among Somali-Australians in Australia and to explore their views about the links between khat use and personal health.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS:

Qualitative study using semistructured focus groups among adult members of Somali communities in Brisbane, Sydney, Melbourne and Perth who volunteered to attend focus groups in January and December 2010.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Emergent themes related to Somali-Australians' understanding of the links between khat use and personal health.

RESULTS:

Nineteen focus groups included 114 participants. Khat use was reported to be common among the Somali community, and more common among men than women. Khat was usually chewed in prolonged sessions, producing mild psychostimulant effects such as increased energy, enhanced mood, reduced appetite and reduced sleep. Khat was widely perceived to be a food, not a drug, and as harmless, or even beneficial, to the user's health. Many users reported discontinuation effects such as lethargy, sleep disturbances and mood problems after sessions of heavy khat use, and some reported self-medicating with alcohol to cope with such problems. Problems of addiction to khat were identified by some participants, but not all believed it is addictive. Many khat users reported visiting their health professionals for treatment of adverse effects and failing to disclose their khat use.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health professionals require greater awareness of khat use and related health problems. Health promotion activities targeting communities with high levels of khat use are required to increase understanding of the potential risks of regular khat use, to promote harm-reduction strategies, and to increase awareness of services available for those experiencing harm. Health professionals should consider targeted screening for khat use among individuals from Horn of Africa communities who present to health services.

PMID:
22171861
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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