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Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2012 Feb;39(2):130-4. doi: 10.1016/j.ijantimicag.2011.10.009. Epub 2011 Dec 12.

Efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin as antibacterial prophylaxis for patients receiving autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a randomised trial.

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1
Department I for Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. janne.vehreschild@ctuc.de

Abstract

Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) are at high risk of infections, especially bacteraemia. A prospective, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, single-centre, pilot study was performed on oral moxifloxacin 400mg versus placebo for preventing bacteraemia in PBSCT recipients. Patients received moxifloxacin or placebo for the duration of neutropenia or until emergence of fever or other infections necessitating intravenous antibiotic treatment. Of 68 patients included in the trial, 2 were excluded from the trial before taking their first dose. The remaining 66 patients were eligible for evaluation in the intention-to-treat analysis set. Neutropenia with an absolute neutrophil count of <500cells/μL developed in 30 moxifloxacin-treated patients (88.2%) and 21 patients in the placebo group (65.6%) (P<0.03). Nine patients (26.5%) and eight patients (25.0%), respectively, were prematurely discontinued from study treatment. Breakthrough bacteraemia occurred in 3 moxifloxacin-treated patients (8.8%) and 9 patients in the placebo group (28.1%) (P=0.042). The time period until fever was 9.5 days [95% confidence interval (CI) 8.06-10.94 days) and 7.69 days (95% CI 6.51-8.85 days), respectively (P=0.0499). There was no difference in adverse events or toxicities between the groups. Moxifloxacin prevented bacteraemia and shortened febrile episodes in patients receiving autologous PBSCT. No significant increase of adverse events in the moxifloxacin arm was observed, possibly due to the rather small sample size.

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