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Sensors (Basel). 2010;10(12):10896-935. doi: 10.3390/s101210896. Epub 2010 Dec 3.

Monitoring the depth of anaesthesia.

Author information

1
Department of Systems and Control, Jožef Stefan Institute/Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia. bojan.musizza@ijs.si

Abstract

One of the current challenges in medicine is monitoring the patients' depth of general anaesthesia (DGA). Accurate assessment of the depth of anaesthesia contributes to tailoring drug administration to the individual patient, thus preventing awareness or excessive anaesthetic depth and improving patients' outcomes. In the past decade, there has been a significant increase in the number of studies on the development, comparison and validation of commercial devices that estimate the DGA by analyzing electrical activity of the brain (i.e., evoked potentials or brain waves). In this paper we review the most frequently used sensors and mathematical methods for monitoring the DGA, their validation in clinical practice and discuss the central question of whether these approaches can, compared to other conventional methods, reduce the risk of patient awareness during surgical procedures.

KEYWORDS:

cognitive binding; consciousness; general anaesthesia; general anaesthesia monitors; soft sensors

PMID:
22163504
PMCID:
PMC3231065
DOI:
10.3390/s101210896
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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