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Ann Surg Oncol. 2012 May;19(5):1484-90. doi: 10.1245/s10434-011-2162-9. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

Clinical and self breast examination remain important in the era of modern screening.

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1
Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Breast cancer screening recommendations are in flux. We reviewed the methods of detecting newly diagnosed breast neoplasms at our institution.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of patients stratified by age was performed to compare mammography with self- (SBE) and clinical (CBE) breast examination methods of cancer detection from 2005 to 2009.

RESULTS:

We identified 782 patients. Patients aged <50 years were more likely to present with palpable disease (P < 0.001). Overall, 75% of patients had a mammogram within 24 months. There was a higher incidence of Tis tumors and lower incidence of T1 tumors if patients had mammography performed within 12 months versus 13-24 months (P < 0.01); tumor size, hormonal status, and lymph node (LN) status were comparable between these two groups. Patients diagnosed by SBE/CBE who had mammography performed within 12 months versus 13-24 months did not differ statistically according to tumor characteristics. In the screened cohort (mammography within 24 months), the majority of patients (64%) were diagnosed by mammography. Cancers detected by SBE/CBE were larger tumors (2.4 vs. 1.3 cm), higher grade, more frequently ER- (29 vs. 16%), triple-negative (21 vs. 10%), and lymph node-positive (39 vs. 18%; all P ≤ 0.01). There were no statistically significant differences in tumor size, T stage, or hormonal status in patients who had analog versus digital mammography.

CONCLUSIONS:

Whereas the majority of patients had image-detected breast cancer, a significant number of image-screened patients presented with palpable disease, which were more aggressive cancers. Until imaging techniques are refined, SBE and CBE remain important for breast cancer diagnosis.

PMID:
22160521
DOI:
10.1245/s10434-011-2162-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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