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Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis. 2012 Feb;129(1):32-7. doi: 10.1016/j.anorl.2011.06.003. Epub 2011 Dec 6.

Transoral robotic surgery in head and neck cancer.

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  • 1Service d'ORL et de chirurgie cervico-faciale, faculté de médecine Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, hôpital européen Georges-Pompidou, Assistance publique, 20 rue Leblanc, Paris, France. stephane.hans@egp.aphp.fr

Abstract

Robots have invaded industry and, more recently, the field of medicine. Following the development of various prototypes, Intuitive Surgical® has developed the Da Vinci surgical robot. This robot, designed for abdominal surgery, has been widely used in urology since 2000. The many advantages of this transoral robotic surgery (TORS) are described in this article. Its disadvantages are essentially its high cost and the absence of tactile feedback. The first feasibility studies in head and neck cancer, conducted in animals, dummies and cadavers, were performed in 2005, followed by the first publications in patients in 2006. The first series including more than 20 patients treated by TORS demonstrated the feasibility for the following sites: oropharynx, supraglottic larynx and hypopharynx. However, these studies did not validate the oncological results of the TORS technique. TORS decreases the number of tracheotomies, and allows more rapid swallowing rehabilitation and a shorter length of hospital stay. Technical improvements are expected. Smaller, more ergonomic, new generation robots, therefore more adapted to the head and neck, will probably be available in the future.

PMID:
22154206
DOI:
10.1016/j.anorl.2011.06.003
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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