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Eur J Intern Med. 2012 Jan;23(1):40-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ejim.2011.07.015. Epub 2011 Aug 23.

Risk of venous thromboembolism in first- and second-generation immigrants in Sweden.

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1
Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University/Region Skåne, Floor 11, Building 28, Entrance 72, Skåne University Hospital, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden. bengt.zoller@med.lu.se

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are ethnic differences in the incidence of venous thromboembolism. This is the first nationwide study to examine whether there is an association between country of birth in first-generation immigrants and first hospitalisation for venous thrombosis (VT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), and to study whether a similar association exists in second-generation immigrants.

METHODS:

The study is a nationwide follow-up study. The study subjects were first- and second-generation immigrants residing in Sweden between January 1, 1964 and December 31, 2007. The reference population comprised first- and second-generation Swedish-born individuals. Standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) for VT and PE, standardised with regard to age, geographic region of residence, time period, and socioeconomic status, were estimated by sex in first- and second-generation immigrants.

RESULTS:

First-generation male and/or female immigrants from Greece, Italy, Spain, Finland, Baltic countries, Central Europe, Eastern Europe, Russia, Latin America, Turkey, Iran, and Iraq had a lower risk of VT and/or PE than Swedish-born individuals. The lower risk of VT and/or PE in some first-generation immigrant groups was not replicated in the second generation. However, in certain second-generation immigrant groups, the risk of VT/PE was similar to that in the corresponding parental groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Country of birth affects the risk of VT and PE in several immigrant groups. Our study indicates that ethnicity-related inherited and acquired venous thromboembolism risk factors play a role in the aetiology of venous thromboembolism. Ethnic differences in thromboembolism risk even exist in Caucasian European populations, and may thus be important to consider in genetic studies.

PMID:
22153530
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejim.2011.07.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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