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Compr Psychiatry. 2012 Aug;53(6):657-65. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2011.10.002. Epub 2011 Dec 5.

Prevalence, patterns, and correlates of co-occurring substance use and mental disorders in the United States: variations by race/ethnicity.

Author information

1
Treatment Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA 19106, USA. americle@tresearch.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study examines racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence, patterns, and correlates of co-occurring substance use and mental disorders (COD) among Whites, Blacks, Latinos, and Asians using data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Studies.

METHOD:

We first estimated the prevalence of various combinations of different co-occurring depressive and anxiety disorders among respondents with alcohol, drug, and any substance use (alcohol or drug) disorders in each racial/ethnic group. We then estimated the prevalence of different patterns of onset and different psychosocial correlates among individuals with COD of different racial/ethnic groups. We used weighted linear and logistic regression analysis controlling for key demographics to test the effect of race/ethnicity. Tests of differences between specific racial/ethnic subgroups were only conducted if the overall test of race was significant.

RESULTS:

Rates of COD varied significantly by race/ethnicity. Approximately 8.2% of Whites, 5.4% of Blacks, 5.8% of Latinos, and 2.1% of Asians met criteria for lifetime COD. Whites were more likely than persons in each of the other groups to have lifetime COD. Irrespective of race/ethnicity, most of those with COD reported that symptoms of mental disorders occurred before symptoms of substance use disorders. Only rates of unemployment and history of psychiatric hospitalization among individuals with COD were found to vary significantly by racial/ethnic group.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings underscore the need to further examine the factors underlying differences between minority and nonminority individuals with COD as well as how these differences might affect help seeking and utilization of substance abuse and mental health services.

PMID:
22152496
PMCID:
PMC3327759
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2011.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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