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Mol Cell. 2011 Dec 9;44(5):710-20. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2011.11.014.

Homeostatic control of mitotic arrest.

Author information

1
Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milan, Italy.

Abstract

The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) restricts mitotic exit to cells that have completed chromosome-microtubule attachment. Cdc20 is a bifunctional protein. In complex with SAC proteins Mad2, BubR1, and Bub3, Cdc20 forms the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which binds the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and inhibits its mitotic exit-promoting activity. When devoid of SAC proteins, Cdc20 serves as an APC/C coactivator and promotes mitotic exit. During mitotic arrest, Cdc20 is continuously degraded via ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and resynthesized. It is believed that this cycle keeps the levels of Cdc20 below a threshold above which Cdc20 would promote mitotic exit. We report that p31(comet), a checkpoint antagonist, is necessary for mitotic destabilization of Cdc20. p31(comet) depletion stabilizes the MCC, super-inhibits the APC/C, and delays mitotic exit, indicating that Cdc20 proteolysis in prometaphase opposes the checkpoint. Our studies reveal a homeostatic network in which checkpoint-sustaining and -repressing forces oppose each other during mitotic arrest and suggest ways for enhancing the sensitivity of cancer cells to antitubulin chemotherapeutics.

PMID:
22152475
DOI:
10.1016/j.molcel.2011.11.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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