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Clin Exp Hypertens. 2012;34(1):38-44. doi: 10.3109/10641963.2011.618207. Epub 2011 Dec 9.

Gender-related association of AGT gene variants (M235T and T174M) with essential hypertension--a case-control study.

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1
Department of Genetics, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, India.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The human angiotensinogen (AGT) is a promising candidate gene for evaluating susceptibility to essential hypertension (EH). We aimed to assess the association of the variants of AGT gene and the extent of risk involved in developing EH.

METHODS:

A case-control study was designed to compare 279 hypertensive patients with 200 normotensive subjects. The frequency distribution of M235T and T174M polymorphisms of AGT gene was assessed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. A haplotype analysis was done to determine the risk conferred by the combination of alleles of the two polymorphisms for EH.

RESULTS:

The genotype distribution of the T174M variant differed significantly between hypertensives and normotensives, whereas genotypes of M235T variant did not show such difference. For M235T, MM genotype conferred an increase in risk for hypertension in women (odds ratios (OR) = 2.82; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.22-6.49). For the variant T174M, the TM genotype frequency was elevated in hypertensive females (36.5%) as compared to controls (18.8 %; P = .034). The 174M allele was more prevalent among female hypertensives than among female controls (0.20 vs. 0.12; P = .059). The haplotype analysis showed a significant association for the haplotypes of paired markers (M235 and 174M) with a χ(2) value of 8.037 (P = .045).

CONCLUSION:

Our findings suggest that the polymorphic variants of AGT gene-M235T and T174M-show association with hypertension.

PMID:
22148914
DOI:
10.3109/10641963.2011.618207
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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