Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2011 Dec;68(12):1267-75. doi: 10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2011.138.

Early risk factors for hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention trajectories from age 17 months to 8 years.

Author information

1
Charles Perrens Hospital, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University Bordeaux Segalen, CHS Charles-Perrens, Bordeaux, France. cedric.galera@u-bordeaux2.fr

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is an etiologically heterogeneous neurodevelopmental condition with long-term negative outcomes. However, the early developmental course of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention symptoms and their association with previous environmental risk factors are still poorly understood

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the developmental trajectories of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention symptoms and to identify their prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal risk factors.

DESIGN:

Birth cohort from the general population.

SETTING:

Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development.

PARTICIPANTS:

The sample consisted of 2057 individuals, followed up from age 5 months to 8 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal risk factors assessed at age 5 months were considered predictors of group membership in high hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention trajectories from age 17 months to 8 years.

RESULTS:

The frequency of hyperactivity-impulsivity symptoms tended to slightly decrease with age, whereas the frequency of inattention symptoms substantially increased up to age 6 years. However, trajectories of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention symptoms were significantly associated with each other. Risk factors for high trajectories of both types of symptoms were premature birth (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.93; 95% CI, 1.07-3.50), low birth weight (2.11; 1.12-3.98), prenatal tobacco exposure (1.41; 1.03-1.93), nonintact family (1.85; 1.26-2.70), young maternal age at birth of the target child (1.78; 1.17-2.69), paternal history of antisocial behavior (1.78; 1.28-2.47), and maternal depression (1.35; 1.18-1.54).

CONCLUSIONS:

A large range of early risk factors, including prenatal, perinatal social, and parental psychopathology variables, act independently to heighten the likelihood of having persistently high levels of hyperactivity-impulsivity and inattention symptoms from infancy to middle childhood. Early interventions should be experimented with to provide effective tools for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder prevention.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center