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Br J Cancer. 2011 Dec 6;105(12):1940-8. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2011.472. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

Segmental chromosomal alterations lead to a higher risk of relapse in infants with MYCN-non-amplified localised unresectable/disseminated neuroblastoma (a SIOPEN collaborative study).

Author information

1
INSERM U830, Laboratoire de Génétique et Biologie des Cancers, 26 rue d'Ulm, Paris Cedex 05, France. gudrun.schleiermacher@curie.net

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In neuroblastoma (NB), the presence of segmental chromosome alterations (SCAs) is associated with a higher risk of relapse.

METHODS:

In order to analyse the role of SCAs in infants with localised unresectable/disseminated NB without MYCN amplification, we have performed an array CGH analysis of tumours from infants enrolled in the prospective European INES trials.

RESULTS:

Tumour samples from 218 out of 300 enroled patients could be analysed. Segmental chromosome alterations were observed in 11%, 20% and 59% of infants enroled in trials INES99.1 (localised unresectable NB), INES99.2 (stage 4s) and INES99.3 (stage 4) (P<0.0001). Progression-free survival was poorer in patients whose tumours harboured SCA, in the whole population and in trials INES99.1 and INES99.2, in the absence of clinical symptoms (log-rank test, P=0.0001, P=0.04 and P=0.0003, respectively). In multivariate analysis, a SCA genomic profile was the strongest predictor of poorer progression-free survival.

CONCLUSION:

In infants with stage 4s MYCN-non-amplified NB, a SCA genomic profile identifies patients who will require upfront treatment even in the absence of other clinical indication for therapy, whereas in infants with localised unresectable NB, a genomic profile characterised by the absence of SCA identifies patients in whom treatment reduction might be possible. These findings will be implemented in a future international trial.

PMID:
22146831
PMCID:
PMC3251887
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2011.472
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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