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Clin Exp Immunol. 2012 Jan;167(1):7-14. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2249.2011.04460.x.

Translational Mini-Review Series on B cell subsets in disease. Transitional B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome: clinical implications and effects of B cell-targeted therapies.

Author information

1
Centre for Immunology and Infectious Disease, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Blizard Institute, London, UK. a.vossenkaemper@qmul.ac.uk

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome are autoimmune disorders which are characterized by a disturbed B cell homeostasis which leads ultimately to dysfunction of various organs. One of the B cell subsets that appear in abnormal numbers is the population of transitional B cells, which is increased in the blood of patients with SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. Transitional B cells are newly formed B cells. In mice, transitional B cells undergo selection checks for unwanted specificity in the bone marrow and the spleen in order to eliminate autoreactive B cells from the circulating naive B cell population. In humans, the exact anatomical compartments and mechanisms of the specificity check-points for transitional B cells remain unclear, but appear to be defective in SLE and Sjögren's syndrome. This review aims to highlight the current understanding of transitional B cells and their defects in the two disorders before and after B cell-targeted therapies.

PMID:
22132879
PMCID:
PMC3248081
DOI:
10.1111/j.1365-2249.2011.04460.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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