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Cancer Biol Ther. 2011 Dec 1;12(11):997-1004. doi: 10.4161/cbt.12.11.18366. Epub 2011 Dec 1.

New variants at 10q26 and 15q21 are associated with aggressive prostate cancer in a genome-wide association study from a prostate biopsy screening cohort.

Author information

1
Division of Urology, Sunnybrook Research Institute, University of Toronto, ON, Canada. robert.nam@utoronto.ca

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To identify and examine polymorphisms of genes associated with aggressive and clinical significant forms of prostate cancer among a screening cohort.

EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN:

We conducted a genome-wide association study among patients with aggressive forms of prostate cancer and biopsy-proven normal controls ascertained from a prostate cancer screening program. We then examined significant associations of specific polymorphisms among a prostate cancer screened cohort to examine their predictive ability in detecting prostate cancer.

RESULTS:

We found significant associations between aggressive prostate cancer and five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 10q26 (rs10788165, rs10749408, and rs10788165, p value for association 1.3 × 10(-10 ) to 3.2 × 10(-11) ) and 15q21 (rs4775302 and rs1994198, p values for association 3.1 × 10(-8 ) to 8.2 × 10(-9)) regions. Results of a replication study done in 3439 patients undergoing a prostate biopsy, revealed certain combinations of these SNPs to be significantly associated not only with prostate cancer but with aggressive forms of prostate cancer using an established classification criterion for prostate cancer progression (odds ratios for intermediate to high-risk disease 1.8-3.0, p value 0.003-0.001). These SNP combinations were also important clinical predictors for prostate cancer detection based on nomogram analysis that assesses prostate cancer risk.

CONCLUSIONS:

Five SNPs were found to be associated with aggressive forms of prostate cancer. We demonstrated potential clinical applications of these associations.

PMID:
22130093
PMCID:
PMC3280918
DOI:
10.4161/cbt.12.11.18366
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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