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Res Dev Disabil. 2012 Mar-Apr;33(2):570-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2011.10.003. Epub 2011 Nov 24.

Validity, responsiveness, minimal detectable change, and minimal clinically important change of the Pediatric Motor Activity Log in children with cerebral palsy.

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1
School of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, 17 F4 Xu-Zhou Road, Taipei, Taiwan.

Abstract

This study examined criterion-related validity and clinimetric properties of the Pediatric Motor Activity Log (PMAL) in children with cerebral palsy. Study participants were 41 children (age range: 28-113 months) and their parents. Criterion-related validity was evaluated by the associations between the PMAL and criterion measures at baseline and posttreatment, including the self-care, mobility, and cognition subscale, the total performance of the Functional Independence Measure in children (WeeFIM), and the grasping and visual-motor integration of the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. Responsiveness was examined using the paired t test and the standardized response mean, the minimal detectable change was captured at the 90% confidence level, and the minimal clinically important change was estimated using anchor-based and distribution-based approaches. The PMAL-QOM showed fair concurrent validity at pretreatment and posttreatment and predictive validity, whereas the PMAL-AOU had fair concurrent validity at posttreatment only. The PMAL-AOU and PMAL-QOM were both markedly responsive to change after treatment. Improvement of at least 0.67 points on the PMAL-AOU and 0.66 points on the PMAL-QOM can be considered as a true change, not measurement error. A mean change has to exceed the range of 0.39-0.94 on the PMAL-AOU and the range of 0.38-0.74 on the PMAL-QOM to be regarded as clinically important change.

PMID:
22119706
DOI:
10.1016/j.ridd.2011.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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