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Horm Behav. 2012 Jan;61(1):114-20. doi: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2011.10.011. Epub 2011 Nov 18.

Hormonal contraceptive use and mate retention behavior in women and their male partners.

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1
Anthropology Department, The Pennsylvania State University, 409 Carpenter Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA. llw21@psu.edu

Abstract

Female hormonal contraceptive use has been associated with a variety of physical and psychological side effects. Women who use hormonal contraceptives report more intense affective responses to partner infidelity and greater overall sexual jealousy than women not using hormonal contraceptives. Recently, researchers have found that using hormonal contraceptives with higher levels of synthetic estradiol, but not progestin, is associated with significantly higher levels of self-reported jealousy in women. Here, we extend these findings by examining the relationship between mate retention behavior in heterosexual women and their male partners and women's use of hormonal contraceptives. We find that women using hormonal contraceptives report more frequent use of mate retention tactics, specifically behaviors directed toward their partners (i.e., intersexual manipulations). Men partnered with women using hormonal contraceptives also report more frequent mate retention behavior, although this relationship may be confounded by relationship satisfaction. Additionally, among women using hormonal contraceptives, the dose of synthetic estradiol, but not of synthetic progesterone, positively predicts mate retention behavior frequency. These findings demonstrate how hormonal contraceptive use may influence behavior that directly affects the quality of romantic relationships as perceived by both female and male partners.

PMID:
22119340
DOI:
10.1016/j.yhbeh.2011.10.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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