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Am J Med. 2012 Jan;125(1):50-6. doi: 10.1016/j.amjmed.2011.06.026. Epub 2011 Nov 24.

Intracerebral hemorrhage with thrombolytic therapy for acute pulmonary embolism.

Author information

1
Department of Research, St Mary Mercy Hospital, Livonia, MI 48154, USA. steinp@trinity-health.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Intracranial hemorrhage is one of the dreaded complications of thrombolytic therapy for acute pulmonary embolism. We identified patients with pulmonary embolism who may be at relatively high risk of intracerebral hemorrhage from those selected for thrombolytic therapy by their physicians and presumably thought to be of reasonable risk.

METHODS:

The number of patients discharged from short-stay hospitals in the United States from 1998 to 2008 with pulmonary embolism who received thrombolytic therapy and the proportion with intracerebral hemorrhage were determined from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

RESULTS:

From 1998 to 2008, 2,237,600 patients were discharged with a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Among patients who received thrombolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism, the prevalence of intracerebral hemorrhage was 430 of 49,500 (0.9%). The prevalence increased linearly with age more than 10 years. Intracerebral hemorrhage was less frequent in those with a primary diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (250/39,300 [0.6%]) than in those with a secondary diagnosis (180/10,300 [1.7%], P<.0001). The prevalence of intracerebral hemorrhage was lower in patients aged 65 years or less with no kidney disease (90/16,900 [0.5%]) than in patients aged more than 65 years or with kidney disease (290/20,900 [1.4%], P<.0001). The prevalence remained lower in those with a primary diagnosis (90/23,000 [0.4%] than in those with a secondary diagnosis (50/5700 [0.9%], P<.0001).

CONCLUSION:

The cause of intracerebral hemorrhage in patients with pulmonary embolism who receive thrombolytic therapy seems to be multifactorial and related to comorbidity and age.

PMID:
22115025
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjmed.2011.06.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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