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PLoS One. 2011;6(11):e27716. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0027716. Epub 2011 Nov 16.

Allergenicity assessment of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin, a potential candidate protein for developing sap sucking insect resistant food crops.

Author information

1
Division of Plant Biology, Bose Institute, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mannose-binding Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is highly antinutritional and toxic to various phloem-feeding hemipteran insects. ASAL has been expressed in a number of agriculturally important crops to develop resistance against those insects. Awareness of the safety aspect of ASAL is absolutely essential for developing ASAL transgenic plants.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Following the guidelines framed by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization, the source of the gene, its sequence homology with potent allergens, clinical tests on mammalian systems, and the pepsin resistance and thermostability of the protein were considered to address the issue. No significant homology to the ASAL sequence was detected when compared to known allergenic proteins. The ELISA of blood sera collected from known allergy patients also failed to show significant evidence of cross-reactivity. In vitro and in vivo assays both indicated the digestibility of ASAL in the presence of pepsin in a minimum time period.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

With these experiments, we concluded that ASAL does not possess any apparent features of an allergen. This is the first report regarding the monitoring of the allergenicity of any mannose-binding monocot lectin having insecticidal efficacy against hemipteran insects.

PMID:
22110739
PMCID:
PMC3218009
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0027716
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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