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Psychiatry Res. 2011 Dec 30;194(3):212-218. doi: 10.1016/j.pscychresns.2011.02.002. Epub 2011 Nov 21.

Dopaminergic mechanisms of target detection - P300 event related potential and striatal dopamine.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: oliver.pogarell@med.uni-muenchen.de.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Munich, Germany.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Leipzig, Germany.
6
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Department of Nuclear Medicine, Municipal Hospital of Karlsruhe Inc., Karlsruhe, Germany.
7
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilian-University of Munich, Munich, Germany.

Abstract

The P300 is a cortically generated event related potential (ERP) widely used in neurophysiological research since it is related to cognitive functions and central information processing. Intracerebral recordings and functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that this potential is generated by various brain regions including frontal, temporal and parietal cortices. Regarding the neurochemical background, clinical and genetic investigations suggest that dopaminergic neurons could be involved in the generation of the P300. However, there is no direct evidence in vivo that P300 amplitudes and latencies are related to dopaminergic parameters. The aim of this study was to further elucidate dopaminergic aspects of the P300 ERP by combining neurophysiological and nuclear medicine assessments in vivo. Patients with a major depressive episode underwent both P300 recordings and dynamic [¹²³I] IBZM SPECT for the evaluation of striatal dopamine D₂/D₃-receptor availability. There were statistically significant positive correlations of the striatal dopamine D₂/D₃-receptor status with P300 amplitudes and significant negative correlations with P300 latencies. Using this combined approach, the study presents direct evidence in vivo that the central dopaminergic system might play an important role in the generation of the P300 and that central dopaminergic activity could be involved in the modulation of P300 parameters. This association might be of relevance for the interpretation of P300 studies in psychiatric disorders.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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