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J Psychiatr Res. 2012 Feb;46(2):141-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2011.10.014. Epub 2011 Nov 17.

A longitudinal test of video game violence influences on dating and aggression: a 3-year longitudinal study of adolescents.

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1
Texas A&M International University, Behavioral Sciences, 5201 University Blvd., Laredo, TX 78041, United States. CJFerguson1111@aol.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In 2011 the field of video game violence experienced serious reversals with repudiations of the current research by the US Supreme Court and the Australian Government as non-compelling and fundamentally flawed. Scholars too have been calling for higher quality research on this issue. The current study seeks to answer this call by providing longitudinal data on youth aggression and dating violence as potential consequences of violent video game exposure using well-validated clinical outcome measures and controlling for other relevant predictors of youth aggression.

METHOD:

A sample of 165, mainly Hispanic youth, were tested at 3 intervals, an initial interview, and 1-year and 3-year intervals.

RESULTS:

Results indicated that exposure to video game violence was not related to any of the negative outcomes. Depression, antisocial personality traits, exposure to family violence and peer influences were the best predictors of aggression-related outcomes.

INTERPRETATION:

The current study supports a growing body of evidence pointing away from video game violence use as a predictor of youth aggression. Public policy efforts, including funding, would best be served by redirecting them toward other prevention programs for youth violence.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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