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Pharmacol Rev. 2012 Jan;64(1):147-65. doi: 10.1124/pr.110.004275. Epub 2011 Nov 16.

Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 1: a novel drug target in cancer development.

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1
School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 Australia.

Abstract

The human arylamine N-acetyltransferases first attracted attention because of their role in drug metabolism. However, much of the current literature has focused on their role in the activation and detoxification of environmental carcinogens and how genetic polymorphisms in the genes create predispositions to increased or decreased cancer risk. There are two closely related genes on chromosome 8 that encode the two human arylamine N-acetyltransferases--NAT1 and NAT2. Although NAT2 has restricted tissue expression, NAT1 is found in almost all tissues of the body. There are several single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the protein coding and 3'-untranslated regions of the gene that affect enzyme activity. However, NAT1 is also regulated by post-translational and environmental factors, which may be of greater importance than genotype in determining tissue NAT1 activities. Recent studies have suggested a novel role for this enzyme in cancer cell growth. NAT1 is up-regulated in several cancer types, and overexpression can lead to increased survival and resistance to chemotherapy. Although a link to folate homeostasis has been suggested, many of the effects attributed to NAT1 and cancer cell growth remain to be explained. Nevertheless, the enzyme has emerged as a viable candidate for drug development, which should lead to small molecule inhibitors for preclinical and clinical evaluation.

PMID:
22090474
DOI:
10.1124/pr.110.004275
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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