Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Hepat Mon. 2011 Jun;11(6):452-8.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and correlation of serum alanin aminotransferase level with histopathologic findings.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IR Iran.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been recognized as the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. It occurs in patients who do not consume alcohol in large amounts. Alanine aminotranferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) are indicators of hepatocellular injury.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine correlation between histopathologic specifications of NAFLD in patients with little or no history of alcohol consumption and the serum level of ALT.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

In a cross-sectional study carried out in two gastroenterology and hepatology clinics in Tehran, Iran, the medical records of those who had undergone liver biopsies between years 2005 and 2009 were reviewed. Clinical and laboratory information of biopsy-proven cases of NAFLD were obtained from 147 eligible medical records. The histopathologic, demographic, and laboratory data of the participants were also collected. Two groups of patients according to their serum ALT level (cut-point of 35 U/L) were defined. The quantitative pathologic grade of the biopsy specimens was determined based on Brunt scoring system.

RESULTS:

We studied 147 NAFLD patients including 127 men (86.4%) and 20 women (13.6%) with a mean ± SD age of 41.4 ± 11.2 years. Considering serum ALT, the mean ± SD quantitative grade of hepatosteatosis was 1.50 ± 0.67 and 1.74 ± 0.73 (p=0.136); advanced fibrosis (consisted of grade III and cirrhosis) was found in 4.5% (1/22) and 5.6% (7/125) of patients (p=0.327).

CONCLUSIONS:

We found that using the cut-off value of 35 U/L for serum ALT level, it has little contribution to predict NAFLD severity.

KEYWORDS:

Histopathology; Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; Serum alanine aminotranferase

PMID:
22087177
PMCID:
PMC3212791

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center