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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2011 Dec 2;415(4):709-13. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2011.10.150. Epub 2011 Nov 6.

Basophil-derived mouse mast cell protease 11 induces microvascular leakage and tissue edema in a mast cell-independent manner.

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1
Department of Immune Regulation, Tokyo Medical and Dental University Graduate School, 1-5-45 Yushima, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8519, Japan.

Abstract

Mouse mast cell protease 11 (mMCP-11) is the most recently identified member of the mouse mast cell tryptase family. This tryptase is preferentially produced by basophils in contrast to other members that are expressed by mast cells but not basophils. Although blood-circulating basophils have long been considered as minor and redundant relatives of tissue-resident mast cells, recent studies illustrated that basophils and mast cells play distinct roles in vivo. To explore the in vivo role of basophil-derived mMCP-11, here we prepared recombinant mMCP-11 and its protease-dead mutant. Subcutaneous injection of the wild-type mMCP-11 but not the mutant induced edematous skin swelling with increased microvascular permeability in a dose-dependent manner. No apparent infiltration of proinflammatory cells including neutrophils and eosinophils was detected in the skin lesions. The cutaneous swelling was abolished by the pretreatment of mice with indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, suggesting the major contribution of prostaglandins to the microvascular leakage. Of note, the cutaneous swelling was elicited even in mast cell-deficient mice, indicating that mast cells are dispensable for the mMCP-11-induced cutaneous swelling. Thus, basophil-derived mMCP-11 can induce microvascular leakage via prostaglandins in a mast cell-independent manner, and may contribute to the development of basophil-mediated inflammatory responses.

PMID:
22086176
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2011.10.150
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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