Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Can Fam Physician. 2011 Nov;57(11):1300-9.

Age equity in different models of primary care practice in Ontario.

Author information

1
C.T. Lamont Primary Health Care Research Centre, √Člisabeth Bruy√®re Research Institute, Ottawa, ON. sdahrouge@bruyere.org

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether the model of service delivery affects the equity of the care provided across age groups.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Ontario.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred thirty-seven practices, including traditional fee-for-service practices, salaried community health centres (CHCs), and capitation-based family health networks and health service organizations.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

To compare the quality of care across age groups using multilevel linear or logistic regressions. Health service delivery measures and health promotion were assessed through patient surveys (N = 5111), which were based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool, and prevention and chronic disease management were assessed, based on Canadian recommendations for care, through chart abstraction (N = 4108).

RESULTS:

Older individuals reported better health service delivery in all models. This age effect ranged from 1.9% to 5.7%, and was larger in the 2 capitation-based models. Individuals aged younger than 30 years attending CHCs had more features of disadvantage (ie, living below the poverty line and without high school education) and were more likely than older individuals to report discussing at least 1 health promotion subject at the index visit. These differences were deemed an appropriate response to greater needs in these younger individuals. The prevention score showed an age-sex interaction in all models, with adherence to recommended care dropping with age for women. These results are largely attributable to the fact that maneuvers recommended for younger women are considerably more likely to be performed than other maneuvers. Chronic disease management scores showed an inverted U relationship with age in fee-for-service practices, family health networks, and health service organizations but not in CHCs.

CONCLUSION:

The salaried model might have an organizational structure that is more conducive to providing appropriate care across age groups. The thrust toward adopting capitation-based payment is unlikely to have an effect on age disparities.

PMID:
22084464
PMCID:
PMC3215613
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center