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Arch Ophthalmol. 2012 Mar;130(3):350-6. doi: 10.1001/archophthalmol.2011.360. Epub 2011 Nov 14.

Retinal microvascular signs and disability in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

Author information

1
Division of Gerontology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. dkim2@bidmc.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To study the associations of retinal microvascular changes, which are associated with systemic conditions and cognitive decline, with disability in performing activities of daily living (ADL).

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study of 1487 community-dwelling participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study (mean age, 78 years) who were free of ADL disability and had available data on retinal signs and carotid intima-media thickness at the 1998-1999 visit. Main outcome measures were incident ADL disability, defined as self-reported difficulty in performing any ADL, by the presence of retinal signs and advanced carotid atherosclerosis, defined by carotid intima-media thickness in the 80th percentile or more or 25% or more stenosis, and potential mediation by cerebral microvascular disease on brain imaging or by executive dysfunction, slow gait, and depressive mood, which are symptoms of frontal subcortical dysfunction.

RESULTS:

During the median follow-up of 3.1 years (maximum, 7.8 years), participants with 2 or more retinal signs had a higher rate of disability than those with fewer than 2 retinal signs (10.1% vs 7.1%; adjusted hazard ratio, 1.45; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-1.69; P < .001). There was no evidence of interaction by advanced carotid atherosclerosis (P > .10). The association seemed to be partially mediated by executive dysfunction, slow gait, and depressive symptoms but not by cerebral microvascular disease on brain imaging.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results provide further support for the pathophysiologic and prognostic significance of microvascular disease in age-related disability. However, it remains to be determined how to best use retinal photography in clinical risk prediction.

PMID:
22084159
PMCID:
PMC3520093
DOI:
10.1001/archophthalmol.2011.360
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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