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J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Jun 13;60(23):5687-92. doi: 10.1021/jf203488k. Epub 2011 Nov 29.

Strawberries, blueberries, and cranberries in the metabolic syndrome: clinical perspectives.

Author information

1
Nutritional Sciences, 301 Human Sciences, Oklahoma State University , Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-6141, United States.

Abstract

Emerging science supports therapeutic roles of strawberries, blueberries, and cranberries in metabolic syndrome, a prediabetic state characterized by several cardiovascular risk factors. Interventional studies reported by our group and others have demonstrated the following effects: strawberries lowering total and LDL-cholesterol, but not triglycerides, and decreasing surrogate biomarkers of atherosclerosis (malondialdehyde and adhesion molecules); blueberries lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure and lipid oxidation and improving insulin resistance; and low-calorie cranberry juice selectively decreasing biomarkers of lipid oxidation (oxidized LDL) and inflammation (adhesion molecules) in metabolic syndrome. Mechanistic studies further explain these observations as up-regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, reduction in renal oxidative damage, and inhibition of the activity of carbohydrate digestive enzymes or angiotensin-converting enzyme by these berries. These findings need confirmation in future studies with a focus on the effects of strawberry, blueberry, or cranberry intervention in clinical biomarkers and molecular mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
22082311
DOI:
10.1021/jf203488k
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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