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Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2012 Jan;21(1):79-86. doi: 10.1002/pds.2265. Epub 2011 Nov 10.

Psychiatric adverse drug reactions reported during a 10-year period in the Swedish pediatric population.

Author information

1
Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Medicine, the Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Psychiatric Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) are frequent in the pediatric population. The aim of the present study was to analyze spontaneously reported psychiatric ADRs in children during a 10-year period.

METHODS:

All spontaneously reported Individual Case Safety Reports (ICSRs) concerning children (<18 years old) and psychiatric adverse reactions assessed as at least possible, registered in the Swedish Drug Information System (SWEDIS) during the period 2001-2010, were extracted and characterized. Age and sex distribution and labeling/registration status were studied.

RESULTS:

A total of 600 ICSRs concerning 744 psychiatric adverse reactions were identified and included in the analysis. Boys were overrepresented among included ICSRs (60.3% vs. 39.7%; p < .001). After exclusion of vaccines, the three most frequently suspected drugs were montelukast, centrally working sympathomimetic drugs, and inhaled glucocorticoids. Serious adverse reactions were reported more frequently for drugs used off-label than for drugs used according to the Swedish Physician's Desk Reference. Aggressiveness was reported more frequently for boys than for girls as were suicidal conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

Psychiatric ADRs in the pediatric population have been reported for a wide range of reactions and drugs and display age and sex differences including a higher number of suicidal reactions in boys. An association was seen between serious reactions and off-label drug use. Further studies are needed to elucidate safety aspects of unlicensed drugs and drugs used off-label and whether there are differences in children's susceptibility to develop ADRs.

PMID:
22076661
DOI:
10.1002/pds.2265
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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