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Int J Mol Sci. 2011;12(10):6936-51. doi: 10.3390/ijms12106936. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

N-acetylcysteine reduces markers of differentiation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

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  • 1Departamento de Química Biológica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Intendente Güiraldes 2160, Pabellón 2, Buenos Aires 1428, Argentina; E-Mails: pablo_calza@hotmail.com (P.C.); daianasapochnik@hotmail.com (D.S.); solecosen@hotmail.com (S.C.); juancalvo@ibyme.conicet.gov.ar (J.C.C.).

Abstract

Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis. Some authors reported that fat accumulation correlates to systemic oxidative stress in humans and mice, but the relationship of lipid production and oxidative metabolism is still unclear. In our laboratory we used 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, which are able to differentiate into mature adipocytes and accumulate lipids, as obesity model. We showed that intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities increased in parallel with fat accumulation. Meanwhile N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well known antioxidant and Glutathione (GSH) precursor, inhibited ROS levels as well as fat accumulation in a concentration-dependent manner. NAC also inhibited both adipogenic transcription factors CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP β) and peroxisomal proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPAR γ) expression; we suggested that intracellular GSH content could be responsible for these effects.

KEYWORDS:

NAC; adipocyte differentiation; triglyceride

PMID:
22072928
PMCID:
PMC3211019
DOI:
10.3390/ijms12106936
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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