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JOP. 2011 Nov 9;12(6):581-5.

Drug-induced acute pancreatitis in a cohort of 328 patients. A single-centre experience from Australia.

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1
Department of Surgery, Modbury Hospital, Modbury, South Australia, Australia.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Acute pancreatitis is associated with risk of morbidity and even mortality. Routine prescription drugs have been linked to the causation of acute pancreatitis.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the incidence, presentation, course and outcome of drug-induced acute pancreatitis amongst patients admitted to a public hospital.

DESIGN/SETTING:

A retrospective analysis of patients presenting with acute pancreatitis to the Modbury Hospital, South Australia from January 2006 to April 2011.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Each admission was reviewed within the electronic database for patient details as well as to determine the aetiological factor. In patients with drug-induced acute pancreatitis, the WHO Probability Scale was used to evaluate causality relationship.

RESULTS:

Three-hundreds and 28 patients were treated for acute pancreatitis during the study period. Biliary and alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis accounted for 80.8% of cases. Eleven patients (2 male and 9 female patients; median age: 59 years) were diagnosed with drug-induced acute pancreatitis. These included 5 cases of codeine-, 2 cases of azathioprine-, and 1 case each of chlorothiazide-, valproic acid-, oestradiol- and simvastatin-induced acute pancreatitis. Nine patients had a mild disease while 2 patients had severe acute pancreatitis with a median hospital stay of 4 days. Withdrawal of the drug resulted in cessation of the attacks in all patients over a median follow-up of 24 months.

CONCLUSIONS:

Routine prescription drugs, as an aetiological factor, accounted for 3.4% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The disease appeared to be more common in middle-aged women. It is likely that the overall incidence of this entity is under-reported owing to the stringent criteria needed to conclusively determine a causal relationship.

PMID:
22072247
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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