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Life Sci. 2012 Jan 2;90(1-2):39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.lfs.2011.10.013. Epub 2011 Oct 26.

Exogenous intravascular nitric oxide enhances ventricular function after hemodilution with plasma expander.

Author information

1
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0412, USA.

Abstract

AIMS:

This study evaluated the hypothesis that exogenous nitric oxide (NO) supplementation during acute hemodilution with plasma expander (PE) provides beneficial effects on cardiac function.

MAIN METHODS:

Acute hemodilution in golden Syrian hamsters was induced by a 40% of blood volume exchange with dextran 70 kDa. Intravascular NO supplementation after hemodilution was accomplished with a NO donor, diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETA NONOate). The test group was treated with DETA NONOate, while the control group received only vehicle. Left ventricular cardiac function was studied using pressure-volume measurements obtained with a miniaturized conductance catheter.

KEY FINDINGS:

Cardiac output increased to 122±5% and 107±1% of the baseline in the group treated with NO donor and the vehicle group, respectively. Stroke work per stroke volume (SW/SV) after hemodilution reduced to 90% of the baseline and the NO donor significantly reduced SW/SV compared to the vehicle. The minimum rate of pressure change (dP/dt(min)) was significantly lower in animals treated with the NO donor compared to vehicle treated animals. Systemic vascular resistance (SVR) decreased to 62±5% of the baseline in the NO donor group whereas the vehicle group SVR decreased to 83±5% of the baseline. Using intravital microscopy analysis of microvessel in the dorsal skinfold window chamber, we established that the NO donor group induced significant vasodilation compared to the vehicle group.

SIGNIFICANCE:

NO supplementation in an acute hemodilution with PE has beneficial effects on cardiac performance. However, the NO supplementation effects with a NO donor are dose-independent and short-lasting.

PMID:
22056371
PMCID:
PMC3246102
DOI:
10.1016/j.lfs.2011.10.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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