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J Pediatr. 2012 Mar;160(3):377-381.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.09.017. Epub 2011 Nov 5.

Respiratory function monitor guidance of mask ventilation in the delivery room: a feasibility study.

Author information

1
Neonatal Services, The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia. georg.schmoelzer@me.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether using a respiratory function monitor (RFM) during mask resuscitation of preterm infants reduces face mask leak and improves tidal volume (V(T)).

STUDY DESIGN:

Infants receiving mask resuscitation were randomized to have the display of an RFM (airway pressure, flow, and V(T) waves) either visible or masked.

RESULT:

Twenty-six infants had the RFM visible, and 23 had the RFM masked. The median mask leak was 37% (IQR, 21%-54%) in the visible RFM group and 54% (IQR, 37%-82%) in the masked RFM group (P = .01). Mask repositioning was done in 19 infants (73%) of the visible group and in 6 infants (26%) of the masked group (P = .001). The median expired V(T) was similar in the 2 groups. Oxygen was provided to 61% of the visible RFM group and 87% of the RFM masked group (P = .044). Continuous positive airway pressure use was greater in the visible RFM group (73% vs 43%; P = .035). Intubation in the delivery room was done in 21% of the visible group and in 57% of the masked group (P = .035).

CONCLUSION:

Using an RFM was associated with significantly less mask leak, more mask adjustments, and a lower rate of excessive V(T).

PMID:
22056350
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpeds.2011.09.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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