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Meat Sci. 1986;12(4):189-203. doi: 10.1016/0309-1740(86)90051-3.

Collagen content of meat carcasses of known history.

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1
AFRC Meat Research Institute, Langford, Bristol, Great Britain.

Abstract

Thirteen beef carcasses and twenty-seven pig carcasses were analysed for collagen content. The beef carcasses were drawn from four breeds and four levels of fatness. They were dissected into ten joints: from the forequarter; shin, brisket, Jacob's ladder, clod, sticking, fore-rib, chuck: from the hindquarter; leg, thin flank and other joints. Samples of each joint were analysed for fat, moisture and collagen. Samples of the total forequarter and hindquarter meat were also analysed. The pig carcasses were drawn from three weight groups and three levels of fatness. Samples from each carcass were analysed for fat, moisture and collagen. Six selected pigs were dissected into five joints: hand, collar, back, streak and ham. Samples of each joint were analysed as described above. Results from beef carcasses showed that collagen in the forequarter (3·2% wet fat-free) was significantly higher than in the hindquarter (2·7% wet fat-free). Within the forequarter collagen in the shin (4·8% wet fat-free) was significantly higher than in the other six joints. Within the hindquarter percentage collagen was significantly highest in the leg (4·2% wet fat-free). There were no significant breed differences. Results from pig carcasses showed an overall mean value for collagen of 2·3% wet fat-free. Percentage collagen was significantly highest in the hand (2·9% wet fat-free).

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