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Work. 2011;40(3):297-302. doi: 10.3233/WOR-2011-1233.

Big Five personality traits and performance anxiety in relation to marching arts satisfaction.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA. jlevy4@utk.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the Big Five personality traits and performance anxiety in relation to marching arts satisfaction.

PARTICIPANTS:

Data were collected from 278 instrumentalists (i.e., brass players and percussionists) and color guard performers (e.g., dancers) representing six world class drum and bugle corps.

METHOD:

PARTICIPANTS completed three measures: the Adolescent Personal Style Inventory was used to measure the Big Five personality factors: Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, Extraversion, and Openness; the Performance Anxiety Questionnaire - used to assess somatic and cognitive symptoms of performance anxiety; and the Marching Arts Satisfaction - used to assess for the physical, social, and contextual environments of drum and bugle corps.

RESULTS:

Correlation and multiple regression analyses revealed concurrent relationships between the Big Five and performance anxiety with satisfaction. A linear combination of the Big Five traits and Performance Anxiety accounted for 36% of the total variance in satisfaction, with Extraversion, Emotional Stability, and Performance Anxiety contributing significant unique variance.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings of the present study suggest that performers who are extraverted, conscientious, and effective at managing general stress - and performance stress in particular - find a greater sense of satisfaction with their participation in world class drum and bugle corps.

PMID:
22045536
DOI:
10.3233/WOR-2011-1233
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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