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J Gastrointest Surg. 2012 Jan;16(1):148-55; discussion 155. doi: 10.1007/s11605-011-1747-8. Epub 2011 Nov 1.

Regulation of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) by p21 is critical for adaptation to massive small bowel resection.

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1
Division of Pediatric Surgery, St. Louis Children's Hospital, Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Adaptation following massive intestinal loss is characterized by increased villus height and crypt depth. Previously, we demonstrated that p21-null mice do not adapt after small bowel resection (SBR). As retinoblastoma protein (Rb) levels are elevated in p21-null crypt cells, we first sought to determine whether Rb is required for normal adaptation. Next, we tested whether Rb expression is responsible for blocked adaptation in p21-nulls.

METHODS:

Genetically manipulated mice and wild-type (WT) littermates underwent either 50% SBR or sham operation. The intestine was harvested at 3, 7, or 28 days later and intestinal adaptation was evaluated. Enterocytes were isolated and protein levels evaluated by Western blot and quantified by optical density.

RESULTS:

Rb-null mice demonstrated increased villus height, crypt depth, and proliferative rate at baseline, but there was no further increase following SBR. Deletion of one Rb allele lowered Rb expression and restored resection-induced adaptation responses in p21-null mice.

CONCLUSION:

Rb is specifically required for resection-induced adaptation. Restoration of adaptation in p21-null mice by lowering Rb expression suggests a crucial mechanistic role for Rb in the regulation of intestinal adaptation by p21.

PMID:
22042567
PMCID:
PMC3779625
DOI:
10.1007/s11605-011-1747-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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