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Womens Health (Lond). 2011 Nov;7(6):677-87. doi: 10.2217/whe.11.67.

Ethnic differences in breast cancer survival: status and determinants.

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1
University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. gertraud@cc.hawaii.edu

Abstract

Ethnic differences in breast cancer survival have been a long-standing concern. The objective of this article is to present relevant studies for all major US racial/ethnic groups including African-Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Japanese-Americans and Native Hawaiians, and to discuss underlying causes of disparity. In comparison to Caucasian women, African-American women continue to experience the poorest breast cancer-specific survival of all ethnic groups in the USA. The prognosis for Latinos, Native Hawaiians and Native Americans is intermediate, better than for African-Americans but not as good as for Caucasians, whereas Japanese-American women tend to have better outcomes. The following possible contributors to the observed differences are discussed in detail: unfavorable distribution of stage at diagnosis due to low screening rates, limited access to care and treatment, tumor type, comorbidities, socioeconomic status, obesity and physical activity.

PMID:
22040209
PMCID:
PMC3256927
DOI:
10.2217/whe.11.67
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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