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Cytokine. 2012 Jan;57(1):136-42. doi: 10.1016/j.cyto.2011.09.029. Epub 2011 Oct 28.

Type 2-diabetes is associated with elevated levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and adiponectin and low levels of leptin in a population of Mexican Americans: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, Human Genetics and Environmental Science, University of Texas Health Sciences Center Houston School of Public Health, Brownsville Regional Campus, Brownsville, Texas, USA. Shaper.Mirza@uth.tmc.edu

Abstract

The goal of the study was to determine the association between diabetes and inflammation in clinically diagnosed diabetes patients. We hypothesized that low-grade inflammation in diabetes is associated with the level of glucose control. Using a cross-sectional design we compared pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in a community-recruited cohort of 367 Mexican Americans with type 2-diabetes having a wide range of blood glucose levels. Cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8) and adipokines (adiponectin, resistin and leptin) were measured using multiplex ELISA. Our data indicated that diabetes as whole was strongly associated with elevated levels of IL-6, leptin, CRP and TNF-α, whereas worsening of glucose control was positively and linearly associated with high levels of IL-6, and leptin. The associations remained statistically significant even after controlling for BMI and age (p=0.01). The association between TNF-α, however, was attenuated when comparisons were performed based on glucose control. Strong interaction effects between age and diabetes and BMI and diabetes were observed for IL-8, resistin and CRP. The cytokine/adipokine profiles of Mexican Americans with diabetes suggest an association between low-grade inflammation and quality of glucose control. Unique to in our population is that the chronic inflammation is accompanied by lower levels of leptin.

PMID:
22035595
PMCID:
PMC3270578
DOI:
10.1016/j.cyto.2011.09.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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