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Bull NYU Hosp Jt Dis. 2011;69(2):136-48.

Rheumatoid arthritis of the cervical spine--clinical considerations.

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1
Departmentof Sports Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple organ systems, joints, ligaments, and bones and commonly involves the cervical spine. Chronic synovitis may result in bony erosion and ligamentous laxity that result in instability and subluxation. Anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS) is the most frequently occurring deformity, due to laxity of the primary and secondary ligamentous restraints. Additional manifestations of RA include cranial settling, subaxial subluxation, or a combination of these. Although clinical findings can be confounded by the severity of multifocal joint and systemic involvement, a careful history is critical to identify symptoms of cervical disease; serial physical examination is the best noninvasive diagnostic tool. Thorough physical and neurologic examinations should be performed in all patients and serial functional assessments charted. Radiographs of the cervical spine with lateral flexion-extension dynamic views should be obtained periodically and used to "clear" the cervical spine before elective surgery requiring general anesthesia. Advanced imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or myelography and computed tomography (CT), may be necessary to evaluate the neuraxis. Early initiation of pharmacotherapy may slow progression of rheumatoid cervical disease. Operative intervention before the onset of advanced myelopathy results in improved outcomes compared to the surgical stabilization of patients whose conditions are more advanced. A multidisciplinary approach involving rheumatology, surgery, and rehabilitation is beneficial to optimize outcomes.

PMID:
22035393
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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