Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Oct;66(10):869-73. doi: 10.1136/jech-2011-200314. Epub 2011 Oct 27.

Benzodiazepine use and risk of dementia: evidence from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS).

Author information

1
Department of Primary Care and Public Health, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. gallacher@cf.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Benzodiazepine use is widespread in older people, although its benefit is uncertain.

AIM:

To investigate the long-term effect of benzodiazepine use upon dementia risk.

METHODS:

A prospective cohort of men seen on five occasions over 22 years with full medication histories, repeat measures of cognitive function and a clinical diagnosis of dementia.

RESULTS:

Of 1134 men with complete data, 103 (9.1%) had been taking benzodiazepines regularly at one or more phases. These men showed a marked increased incidence of dementia (OR=3.50, 95% CI 1.57 to 7.79, p=0.002), which persisted despite adjustment for psychological distress and other covariates. Men exposed in earlier phases showed a greater association than more recent exposure, counter to what one would expect if this was due to reverse causation, though we failed to demonstrate a dose-response effect with drug duration.

CONCLUSION:

The taking of benzodiazepines is associated with an increased risk of dementia.

PMID:
22034632
DOI:
10.1136/jech-2011-200314
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center