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Stroke. 2012 Jan;43(1):163-9. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.621029. Epub 2011 Oct 27.

Child-Mediated Stroke Communication: findings from Hip Hop Stroke.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Harlem Hospital, Harlem Hospital Center, New York, NY, USA. ow11@columbia.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Low thrombolysis rates for acute ischemic stroke are linked to delays in seeking immediate treatment due to low public stroke awareness. We aimed to assess whether "Child-Mediated Stroke Communication" could improve stroke literacy of parents of children enrolled in a school-based stroke literacy program called Hip Hop Stroke.

METHODS:

Parents of children aged 9 to 12 years from 2 public schools in Harlem, New York City, were recruited to participate in stroke literacy questionnaires before and after their child's participation in Hip Hop Stroke, a novel Child-Mediated Stroke Communication intervention delivered in school auditoriums. Parental recall of stroke information communicated through their child was assessed 1-week after the intervention.

RESULTS:

Fifth and sixth grade students (n=182) were enrolled into Hip Hop Stroke. One hundred two parents were approached in person to participate; 75 opted to participate and 71 completed both the pretest and post-test (74% response rate and 95% retention rate). Parental stroke literacy improved after the program; before the program, 3 parents of 75 (3.9%) were able to identify the 5 cardinal stroke symptoms, distracting symptom (chest pains), and had an urgent action plan (calling 911) compared with 21 of 71 parents (29.6%) postintervention (P<0.001). The FAST mnemonic was known by 2 (2.7%) of participants before the program versus 29 (41%) after program completion (P<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Knowledge of stroke signs and symptoms remains low among residents of this high-risk population. The use of Child-Mediated Stroke Communication suggests that school children aged 9 to 12 years may be effective conduits of critical stroke knowledge to their parents.

PMID:
22033995
PMCID:
PMC3246577
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.621029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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