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Mayo Clin Proc. 2011 Nov;86(11):1056-62. doi: 10.4065/mcp.2011.0148.

Associations of preexisting depression and anxiety with hospitalization in patients with cardiovascular disease.

Author information

1
Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the risk of hospitalization and death in relation to preexisting depression and anxiety among patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD).

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

The cohort consisted of 799 Olmsted County, MN, residents diagnosed with CVD (myocardial infarction or heart failure) from January 1, 1979, to December 31, 2009, who completed a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) prior to their event. The MMPI was used to identify depression and anxiety, and participants were followed up for hospitalizations and death during an average of 6.2 years.

RESULTS:

Depression and anxiety were identified in 282 (35%) and 210 (26%) participants, respectively. After adjustment, depression and anxiety were independently associated with a 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 8%-51%) and 26% (95% CI, 3%-53%) increased risk of being hospitalized, respectively. Depression also conferred an increased risk of all-cause mortality of similar magnitude, whereas the hazard ratio for anxiety was not statistically significant. The combined occurrence of depression and anxiety led to a 35% (95% CI, 8%-71%) increase in the risk of hospitalizations.

CONCLUSION:

Among patients with CVD, both preexisting depression and anxiety, occurring on average 17 years before the CVD event, independently predict hospitalizations. In addition, the 2 conditions may act synergistically on increasing health care utilization in patients with CVD.

PMID:
22033250
PMCID:
PMC3202995
DOI:
10.4065/mcp.2011.0148
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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