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Br J Cancer. 2011 Nov 22;105(11):1776-82. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2011.443. Epub 2011 Oct 25.

A nationwide study of aspirin, other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and Hodgkin lymphoma risk in Denmark.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention Institute of California, 2201 Walnut Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538, USA. ellen@cpic.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We recently found an inverse association between low-dose aspirin use and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) in northern Denmark. To strengthen the evidence for this association, we expanded the study base to include all of Denmark.

METHODS:

Between 1997 and 2009, 1659 incident HL cases were identified in nationwide databases and matched with ≤5 population controls on age, sex, and residence. Use of aspirin, selective cyclooxygenase-2 (sCOX-2) inhibitors, and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) from 1995 through 2008 (≥1 year before the index date) was ascertained via the Danish National Prescription Database. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations with HL risk were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

RESULTS:

Ever use (>2 prescriptions) vs never/rare use (≤2 prescriptions) of low-dose aspirin was not associated with HL risk, but the association with long-term use for ≥7 years vs never/rare use was clearly inverse, although statistically nonsignificantly so (OR=0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.39-1.09). By contrast, ever use of sCOX-2 inhibitors or other NSAIDs (OR=1.27, 95% CI: 1.10-1.47), especially short-term and low- or medium-intensity use, was associated with elevated HL risk.

CONCLUSION:

Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that long-term use of low-dose aspirin, but not other NSAIDs, protects against HL development.

PMID:
22027707
PMCID:
PMC3242601
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2011.443
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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