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Eur J Med Res. 2011 Sep 12;16(9):385-90.

Increased levels of anti-glycan antibodies in patients with cystic fibrosis.

Author information

1
1st Department of Internal Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany. tim.hirche@dkd-wiesbaden.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of Crohn's disease (CD) is increased in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) have been suggested as a screening tool to detect CD in CF. Recently, several new anti-glycan antibodies have been reported in CD. -

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The sera of 119 CF patients of various age groups were prospectively screened for ASCA type IgG (gASCA), anti-laminaribioside carbohydrate IgG antibodies (ALCA), anti-chitobioside carbohydrate IgA antibodies (ACCA), and anti-mannobioside carbohydrate IgG antibodies (AMCA). The frequency of these anti-glycan antibodies was then compared in patients with CD, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis and healthy volunteers. -

RESULTS:

A significant number of CF patients were positive for gASCA (51.3% (41.6-60.6)) and up to three other anti-glycan antibodies concurrently. Serum levels of anti-glycan antibodies in CF and CD were not related to parameters of inflammation. Despite the well-documented difference in clinical course between male and female CF patients no gender difference of anti-glycan antibodies was found. In contrast, there was a significant positive correlation between anti-glycan markers and age in CF patients. -

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings demonstrate for the first time the increased frequency of a panel of anti-glycan antibodies in CF and provide a link between the presence of these serological biomarkers and patient's age. Anti-glycan antibody profiling may therefore become a valuable tool in the care of patients with CF.

PMID:
22024437
PMCID:
PMC3352142
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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