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Breast. 2012 Jun;21(3):272-5. doi: 10.1016/j.breast.2011.10.001. Epub 2011 Oct 21.

Pregnancy after treatment of breast cancer in young women does not adversely affect the prognosis.

Author information

1
Breast Cancer Unit, Service of Gynecology, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. ocordoba@vhebron.net

Abstract

We assessed whether pregnancy after breast cancer in patients younger than 36 years of age affects the prognosis. Of 115 women with breast cancer followed for a mean of 6 years, 18 became pregnant (median time between diagnosis and the first pregnancy 44.5 months). Voluntary interruption of pregnancy was decided by 8 (44.4%) women. Significant differences in prognostic factors between pregnant and non-pregnant women were not observed. Pregnant women showed a lower frequency of positive estrogen receptors (41%) than non-pregnant (64%) (P=0.06). At 5 years of follow-up, 100% of women in the pregnant group and 80% in the non-pregnant group were alive. The percentages of disease-free women were 94% and 64%, respectively (P=0.009). Breast cancer patients presented a high number of unwanted pregnancies. Pregnancy after breast cancer not only did not adversely affect prognosis of the neoplasm but also may have a protective effect.

PMID:
22018510
DOI:
10.1016/j.breast.2011.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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