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J Safety Res. 2011 Aug;42(4):283-90. doi: 10.1016/j.jsr.2011.06.001. Epub 2011 Jul 31.

A national evaluation of the nighttime and passenger restriction components of graduated driver licensing.

Author information

1
Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, 11720 Beltsville Drive Suite 900, Calverton, Maryland 20705, USA. fell@pire.org

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The high crash rate of youthful novice drivers has been recognized for half a century. Over the last decade, graduated driver licensing (GDL) systems, which extend the period of supervised driving and limit the novice's exposure to higher-risk conditions (such as nighttime driving), have effectively reduced crash involvements of novice drivers.

METHOD:

This study used data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and the implementation dates of GDL laws in a state-by-year panel study to evaluate the effectiveness of two key elements of GDL laws: nighttime restrictions and passenger limitations.

RESULTS:

Nighttime restrictions were found to reduce 16- and 17-year-old driver involvements in nighttime fatal crashes by an estimated 10% and 16- and 17-year-old drinking drivers in nighttime fatal crashes by 13%. Passenger restrictions were found to reduce 16- and 17-year-old driver involvements in fatal crashes with teen passengers by an estimated 9%.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results confirm the effectiveness of these provisions in GDL systems. Impact on Public Health. States without the nighttime or passenger restrictions in their GDL law should strongly consider adopting them.

IMPACT ON INDUSTRY:

The results of this study indicate that nighttime restrictions and passenger limitations are very important components of any GDL law.

PMID:
22017831
PMCID:
PMC3251518
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsr.2011.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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