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Am J Prev Med. 2011 Nov;41(5):487-93. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.07.019.

Environmental tobacco smoke exposure and Chinese schoolchildren's respiratory health: a prospective cohort study.

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1
School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Hubei, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although China is the most coveted cigarette market worldwide, few studies have examined the longitudinal effects of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) on health.

PURPOSE:

To examine the relationship between exposure to ETS and respiratory health in Chinese schoolchildren.

METHODS:

The study subjects included 1718 children, who were never-smokers, aged 10.05±0.86 years and asthma-free at baseline. The children performed spirometric tests in 2006 and 18 months later. Parents reported the children's respiratory symptoms and illnesses, ETS exposure, and other related information by self-administered survey at both assessment points. The data were analyzed in 2010.

RESULTS:

Significant exposure-response relationships were found between ETS exposure and coughing at night (p for trend<0.001); sneezing (p for trend=0.031); and sneezing with itchy, watery eyes (p for trend=0.006) in the first survey, and coughing at night (p for trend=0.019); phlegm without a cold (p for trend<0.001); and sneezing (p for trend=0.036) in the second survey. Compared with those who reported no ETS exposure in either survey, children who had a high ETS exposure level (>5 cigarettes/day) in either survey had lower growth rates in forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of forced vital capacity (FEF(25-75); β= -0.104, p=0.020) and forced expiratory flow at 25% of forced vital capacity (FEF(25); β= -0.077, p=0.027). A monotonic exposure-response effect was observed between ETS exposure and the deficits in the growth rate of FEF(25) and FEF(25-75.)

CONCLUSIONS:

Exposure to ETS increased the risks of respiratory symptoms in Chinese school-aged children and was associated with impaired lung function growth. A dose-response relationship was observed for the latter effect.

PMID:
22011419
DOI:
10.1016/j.amepre.2011.07.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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