Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2012 Feb;10(1):70-6. doi: 10.1089/met.2011.0057. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Total physical activity volume, physical activity intensity, and metabolic syndrome: 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Author information

1
Brooks College of Health, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32224, USA. j.churilla@unf.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined the association of total physical activity volume (TPAV) and physical activity (PA) from three domains [leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), domestic, transportation] with metabolic syndrome. We also investigated the relationship between LTPA intensity and metabolic syndrome risk.

METHODS:

Sample included adults who participated in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Physical activity measures were created for TPAV, LTPA, domestic PA, and transportational PA. For each, a six-level measure based upon no PA (level 1) and quintiles (levels 2-6) of metabolic equivalents (MET)·min·wk(-1) was created. A three-level variable associated with the current Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) PA recommendation was also created. SAS and SUDAAN were used for the statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

Adults reporting the greatest volume of TPAV and LTPA were found to be 36% [odds ratio (OR) 0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49-0.83] and 42% (OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.43-0.77), respectively, less likely to have metabolic syndrome. Domestic and transportational PA provided no specific level of protection from metabolic syndrome. Those reporting a TPAV that met the DHHS PA recommendation were found to be 33% (OR 0.67; 95%; CI 0.55-0.83) less likely to have metabolic syndrome compared to their sedentary counterparts. Adults reporting engaging in only vigorous-intensity LTPA were found to be 37% (OR 0.63; 95 CI 0.42-0.96) to 56% (OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.29-0.67) less likely to have metabolic syndrome.

CONCLUSIONS:

Volume, intensity, and domain of PA may all play important roles in reducing the prevalence and risk of metabolic syndrome.

PMID:
22010793
DOI:
10.1089/met.2011.0057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Loading ...
Support Center