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Psychol Med. 2012 Jun;42(6):1185-93. doi: 10.1017/S0033291711002169. Epub 2011 Oct 19.

Changes in problem-solving appraisal after cognitive therapy for the prevention of suicide.

Author information

1
Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814-4799, USA. mholloway@usuhs.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cognitive therapy has been found to be effective in decreasing the recurrence of suicide attempts. A theoretical aim of cognitive therapy is to improve problem-solving skills so that suicide no longer remains the only available option. This study examined the differential rate of change in problem-solving appraisal following suicide attempts among individuals who participated in a randomized controlled trial for the prevention of suicide.

METHOD:

Changes in problem-solving appraisal from pre- to 6-months post-treatment in individuals with a recent suicide attempt, randomized to either cognitive therapy (n = 60) or a control condition (n = 60), were assessed by using the Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Revised, Short Form.

RESULTS:

Improvements in problem-solving appraisal were similarly observed for both groups within the 6-month follow-up. However, during this period, individuals assigned to the cognitive therapy condition demonstrated a significantly faster rate of improvement in negative problem orientation and impulsivity/carelessness. More specifically, individuals receiving cognitive therapy were significantly less likely to report a negative view toward life problems and impulsive/carelessness problem-solving style.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cognitive therapy for the prevention of suicide provides rapid changes within 6 months on negative problem orientation and impulsivity/carelessness problem-solving style. Given that individuals are at the greatest risk for suicide within 6 months of their last suicide attempt, the current study demonstrates that a brief cognitive intervention produces a rapid rate of improvement in two important domains of problem-solving appraisal during this sensitive period.

PMID:
22008384
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291711002169
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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